Hatchery AND Wild

The future of Pacific Northwest salmon and steelhead

The stories that need to be told

Watch the movie! Sign the Petition!

Sport, Tribal, and Commercial fishermen don’t always agree and are often times at odds with each other, but we agree that hatchery and wild salmon are very important to our way of life. Check out the new video “Hatchery AND Wild” to hear stories that showcase the cultural, ecological, economic, and social importance of Pacific Northwest fish, both hatchery and wild.  You will never view hatcheries the same way again! Get involved and make a difference by signing the petition today.

Producers

“Hatchery AND Wild” is made possible through the generous support of these fine sponsors

Executive Producers

association-of-northwest-steelheaders ClackaCraft critfc Salmon for all olympic-pennisula-guidesassociation3Riverswillie-boatsSandy SteelheadersEmerald Empire Chapter of the Northwest Steelheaders /  McLoughin Chapter of the Northwest Steelheaders

 

 Associate Producers

Fmanslamiglas okumaShimano

Co-Producers

fisheng logo

Frank Amato
Robert Bitney
Mid-Valley Chapter of the Northwest Steelheaders
Ching Wu

Petition

Please sign the petition now to save our fishing and recover fish runs

Dear Oregon and Washington decision makers,

Sport, Tribal and Commercial fishermen and women depend on strong salmon and steelhead runs for economic, social and cultural reasons. Hatcheries have been part of the management landscape for over 100 years. Mismanaged, hatcheries can create problems on top of those they were intended to compensate for. Properly managed,  hatcheries can be a tool of wild fish restoration by supplementing natural spawning and thereby increasing natural-origin fish abundance and spatial distribution, by serving as a source population for repopulating unoccupied habitat, by conserving genetic resources, and by providing much-needed marine-derived nutrients to river systems.

There are not many examples of where removing or reducing hatchery fish has increased the wild runs, but there are an increasing number of examples where hatchery fish have helped increase the wild runs. A broadening base of scientific literature shows a range of outcomes that correlate with smarter management. Hatcheries are no longer operated as they were just a few decades ago. Hatcheries are often managed to achieve a hatchery stray rate of <10%, incorporate wild fish into the broodstock  and/or use locally-adapted broodstock, and/or separate or sort out hatchery fish from natural spawning areas, among other hatchery reform techniques to minimize negative effects  on wild populations.

It’s important to remember the limiting factors the required the use of hatchery fish as mitigation have not disappeared. We still have a range of man-made and natural mortalities that are extremely damaging to wild fish populations. Climate change and population growth may exacerbate these limiting factors, making hatcheries even more vital, not only for fishing opportunity, but also for wild populations in the future.

Reducing or eliminating hatchery production serves little, if any, public purpose, and fishermen and the many businesses that depend on them are the ones that suffer for it. I encourage you to recognize hatcheries as a vitally important part of our Pacific Northwest heritage, to utilize wild broodstock and other hatchery reform measures to decrease the risk of negative impacts of hatchery fish, and to fully fund our hatcheries while we all work to address the range of threats to sustainable natural salmon production.

I Support Hatchery and Wild Fish

Dear Oregon and Washington decision makers,

Sport, Tribal and Commercial fishermen and women depend on strong salmon and steelhead runs for economic, social and cultural reasons. Hatcheries have been part of the management landscape for over 100 years. Mismanaged, hatcheries can create problems on top of those they were intended to compensate for. Properly managed, hatcheries can be a tool of wild fish restoration by supplementing natural spawning and thereby increasing natural-origin fish abundance and spatial distribution, by serving as a source population for repopulating unoccupied habitat, by conserving genetic resources, and by providing much-needed marine-derived nutrients to river systems.

There are not many examples of where removing or reducing hatchery fish has increased the wild runs, but there are an increasing number of examples where hatchery fish have helped increase the wild runs. A broadening base of scientific literature shows a range of outcomes that correlate with smarter management. Hatcheries are no longer operated as they were just a few decades ago. Hatcheries are often managed to achieve a hatchery stray rate of <10%, incorporate wild fish into the broodstock and/or use locally-adapted broodstock, and/or separate or sort out hatchery fish from natural spawning areas, among other hatchery reform techniques to minimize negative effects on wild populations.

It’s important to remember the limiting factors that required the use of hatchery fish as mitigation have not disappeared. We still have a range of man-made and natural mortalities that are extremely damaging to wild fish populations. Climate change and population growth may exacerbate these limiting factors, making hatcheries even more vital, not only for fishing opportunity, but also for wild populations in the future.

Reducing or eliminating hatchery production serves little, if any, public purpose, and fishermen and the many businesses that depend on them are the ones that suffer for it. I encourage you to recognize hatcheries as a vitally important part of our Pacific Northwest heritage, to utilize wild broodstock and other hatchery reform measures to decrease the risk of negative impacts of hatchery fish, and to fully fund our hatcheries while we all work to address the range of threats to sustainable natural salmon and steelhead production.

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Updates

Great turn out for the Premiers! The full video can now be seen on the Hatchery AND Wild Website. DVD’s are available for purchase at the Northwest Steelheaders shop HERE.

If you are attending the Sportsman Show in Portland (February 6-10, 2014) several of the producers will be playing the movie at their booths.

We are not planning on hosting any more premiers as we have made movie available free of charge on this website. You are highly encouraged to play the movie at civic events, in classrooms and to share with your friends.

Help spread the word. Get your friends, family and co-workers to watch the movie and sign the petition.

Contact

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